Statin Medications – Separating Truth from Myth

Statin Medications – Separating Truth from Myth

Statin medications are generally prescribed to help lower cholesterol. They also play an important role in helping reduce the risk of heart attacks and strokes in people who have diabetes, regardless of cholesterol levels. In recent years, however, many misconceptions about statin medications have widely circulated, causing some users to question if the drugs are safe to use or needed at all. In truth, there has been little to no science backing these false claims.

You should feel confident in your prescription drug use, and we’re here to help you understand the science behind statin medications. Knowing the truth will help clear the confusion caused by these common myths. To find out more about specific myths, click the video links below:

  1. Statins are all hype with little benefit 
  2. Statins will cause diabetes
  3. Statins will cause muscle pain 
  4. Statins aren’t needed if cholesterol levels are okay
  5. Statins will cause dementia
  6. Other prescriptions used to lower cholesterol are as good or better than statins
  7. Over-the-counter products, like red yeast rice, are a better alternative to statins

The truth remains that statin use, coupled with a healthy lifestyle, can reduce risk of heart attack and stroke. A variety of tactics like eating a healthy diet, increasing physical activity and taking your medications as prescribed are also important in helping you maintain and improve your health. Taking a statin can further reduce your risk of stroke or heart attack, allowing you to live a healthier life, so you have more time to enjoy the things you love.

If you have questions, please call Network Health at the number on the back of your ID card and ask to speak with one of our pharmacists (available Monday- Friday, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.).

 


Discussion

1 comment

  1. Judy Leicht says:

    Statins can cause muscle fatigue and aches. We’ve known many people who have had that issue. In most cases, changing to a different stating drug helped.

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